Posts Tagged ‘music’

Jazz Pas Grave III, Day 2

Monday, June 16th, 2014

Some highlights from day 2…

Antonin Fresson, Quadri-Cor

Antonin Fresson, Quadri-Cor

Yoann Godefroy and singer Kephny Eliacin

Yoann Godefroy and singer Kephny Eliacin

Balthazar Regea, from Soma Age

Balthazar Regea, from Soma Age

Antoine and Martin Beux, with Jungles Key

Antoine and Martin Beux, with Jungles Key

Maxime Bureau, with Soma Age

Maxime Bureau, with Soma Age

Mac, the funny front man of Funk Me Tender

Mac, the funny front man of Funk Me Tender

Beautiful profiles in the crowd, just because

Beautiful profiles in the crowd, just because

Le Classique C’est Pour les Vieux – Day 1

Saturday, June 7th, 2014

Yesterday a 3-day classical music festival, which thinks outside of the box of what we might expect “classical” music to be, kicked off at 59 rue de Rivoli in Paris. This is the 3rd edition that I’ve photographed for them. This year two concerts were performed in the St Merri church, and the last concert of the night, Le Cabaret Contemporain, an electronic-dance-classical-move-your-body hybrid, transformed the 59 gallery into a nightclub.

The street performance with Léa Scher, Sabine Rivière and Luise Hakim interacts with curious pedestrian traffic

The street performance with Léa Scher, Sabine Rivière and Luise Hakim interacts with curious pedestrian traffic

Le Spat'sonore, 6th floor

Le Spat’sonore, 6th floor

Simone, Le Cabaret Contemporain

Simone Drappier, Le Cabaret Contemporain

During Le Cabaret Contemporain concert

Fabrizio Rat, pianist.  Le Cabaret Contemporain

Fabrizio Rat, pianist. Le Cabaret Contemporain

L'itinéraire, St Merri church

L’itinéraire, St Merri church

Duo Links performs 'Studi sulla note" in the St Merri church

Duo Links performs ‘Studi sulla note” in the St Merri church

Jazz Pas Grave II – day two

Sunday, June 10th, 2012


Tony Tixier and his intense relationship with the piano.


3someSisters. They may look like clowns, but they have the most stunning and impeccably choreographed voices.


Louis Carrion, of the group Funkable


Singer performing with the group Funkable.

What are they doing in there?

Jazz Pas Grave II – day one

Saturday, June 9th, 2012

A few marvelous moments from the first of a three-day jazz festival at 59 rue de Rivoli in Paris.


Nicolas Genest with his group Hati


Guest sax player with O.R.U.S. Quartet


Malamente and Frank Cosentini of Guappecarto


Store-front concert on rue de Rivoli being saved into a compact camera

D – 2 weeks: 40 hours of jazz

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012

Loosely defined, a plethora of genres, a place for musicians to meet and collaborations to form…. In two weeks I’ll be photographing a three-day jazz festival at 59 rue de Rivoli in Paris. These guys will be playing. Les Guappecarto. They are lovely subjects to have in front of the camera. Gorgeous music too.

Pierre La Braguette, Malamente, Professor, Frank Cosentini, & Dr. Zingarone

Frank Cosentini of Guappecarto

Dr. Zingarone of Guappecarto.

Manuel & Music

Wednesday, October 19th, 2011

Barry Desmond Jones, Manuel Baldassare and Schimon, playing music after a vernissage at 59 rue de Rivoli

When he makes art his insides come out – through his voice, through his hands, in painting, installation or music – and it appears to be as natural as breathing.

An illustrative story…one night we were at a jazz club. One of those on rue des Lombards. It was more or less a jam session night. He went out to smoke, and when he came back inside he made a B line straight for the stage and started playing the congas. I didn’t know he’d met one of the musicians outside, who invited him up to play. What I saw was my friend boldly going on stage without a word and playing like his life depended on it. Shy people like myself are in awe of such confidence and would like it to rub off.

This was Manu last year.
He still smiles like he did when I met him.

Manuel singing Freedom with as much emotion as Richie Havens

Manu’s site, for a look into his twisted universe.

Jazz heals all wounds

Saturday, June 4th, 2011

Two weekends ago I photographed a 3-day jazz festival at 59 rue de Rivoli in Paris. During these days it occurred to me that jazz just may heal all wounds. There is music that can open wounds and even inflicts wounds, music that reminds you of old wounds, and music that reminds you of what has already healed.

In any mood, on any day, jazz is welcome to my ears. Of course, there is a huge range within it and I have a preference for the 50s (ah, imagine driving in a 1954 Panhard Dyna Z listening to Buddy Murrow…). But sometimes the right medicine is simply a freely traveling saxophone (Isaac Kemo can make his growl) or the muffled voice of a trumpet to take me away. And other times I crave jumping ragtime, funk or soul, something highly improvised or something slow and blue. The uniqueness of the genre, in my life, is that I will never say no to it.

Nicolas Moreau and Melvin Marquez playing with Tiss Rodriguez

Exception: free jazz is only desirable live.

The only thing Nietzsche ever said that made immediate sense to me

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011

A glance at my bookshelf

A classical weekend at 59

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

I spent the weekend photographing a classical music festival at 59 (click here for the story of 59 rue de Rivoli in Paris). It was an ambitious undertaking, with concerts in the ground-floor gallery every hour, 10 hours a day, as well as performances on all six floors. It was open to the public and all completely free, or however much you felt like contributing.

A piano was somehow maneuvered into Suisse’s Musée Igor Balut, where Lise Charrin was playing Bach and Scarlatti.

Lise Charrin nestled in the Musée Igor Balut with piano

Honky Tonk Night in Paris

Sunday, March 21st, 2010

Ah the slide guitar is comforting…
And Sal Bernardi plays it like it’s an extension of his body.

Friends had a gig for “honky tonk night” at the Café Courant on Friday.
When I hear country music in Paris,
I get homesick.

Is there a music more uniquely American?

Ericka Knudson: vocals and guitar
Tommy Arnold: bass and vocals
Russ Hoag; percussion
and Sal Bernardi: guitar


Cinquantanove

Monday, February 22nd, 2010

It’s been Italian week at 59. The gallery is hosting three artists (Antonio Bonura, Marianna Mendozza and Angelo Maisto) who drove up to Paris last weekend. We’ve simultaneously had Guappecarto (longtime friends of 59) play concerts here in the gallery, at New Morning and at L’International. The rhythm of the language is the air and the Tuscan wine is flowing.

Yesterday I arrived at 59 needing desperately to make photos. I set up my lights fast, trying not to trip visitors with my cables (high Sunday afternoon traffic), and ran down to the gallery to propose a quick shoot with Marianna, Saverio, Angelo, Tony and his dog Rocco before the concert started.

Marianna Mendozza and Saverio Montella

Marianna Mendozza and Saverio Montella

Antonio Bonura and Rocco

Antonio Bonura and Rocco

Angelo Maisto

Angelo Maisto


After those spontaneous portraits, I ran down to the gallery where Guappecarto had started playing. If you are in Paris and you don’t know them already, check ’em out. The first time I heard them play was also the day I entered 59 Rivoli for the first time. On the inspiration scale, this day was seriously high.

Frank Cosentini et Dr Zingarone, Guappecarto

The Guappecarto guys are charming as hell and play with a passion that translates emotion into sound in a direct line from their hearts to ours.  I’m kind of a fan. The music can be soothing, but it’s also got an energy inspiring to action, to creation, to dance, to do SOMETHING… and a bit of dreaming of the sea, and late nights in Italy. Their passion is matched by their humor and hearing their music live is some kind of nourishment that words can’t match.

Guappecarto: Malamente, Frank et Zingarone